The lodger nicholl charles. The Lodger by Charles Nicholl 2019-02-16

The lodger nicholl charles Rating: 6,4/10 458 reviews

Review: The Lodger by Charles Nicholl

the lodger nicholl charles

I've seen the hard working business people and their wives whose pretty faces were an additional attraction to customers, I've seen the churches, the gardens, the theatres and the seamier underworld of cro I feel as if I've been on a walk through the 16th century streets of London. I found myself looking for I was surprised to discover how much there was to glean from the bits of documentation about Shakespeare at this time of his life. The Lodger Author s : Share 'One Mr Shakespeare that laye in the house. He turned out not to be so very valuable, and that's part of the story. If an author feels maps and illustrations and charts and the like are useful, then audio is not the way to go.

Next

The Lodger by Charles Nicholl

the lodger nicholl charles

. Streets - for several years during the decade, the immigrant populations of London the Mountjoys, or Montjois, were French Huguenots that Shakepeare seemed so knowledgeable of, the London bawdy-house scene that is so well represented in plays produced by Shakespeare's company and written by Shakespeare and other denizens of his Cripplegate neighborhood, including his infamous co-author George Wilkins. The book in fact does not say a lot about him personally, but by describing the world in which he lived and the people he knew and worked with the reader sees him from a fresh perspective. His most recent book was the acclaimed biography, Leonardo da Vinci: The Flights of the Mind, which has been published in 17 languages. At the end of the session Shakespeare signed his name at the bottom. I felt as thought I would do any moment run into Shakes in the streets of London. But the portrait of William Shakespeare — the Lodger — drawn through this book is one I enjoyed the evolution of.

Next

The Lodger: Shakespeare on Silver Street by Charles Nicholl.

the lodger nicholl charles

Outside the obsessively patrilineal English histories, trouble between fathers and daughters seems just as common, whether the daughter is getting married, as in the comedies and the romances, or is married and then killed, as in several of the tragedies. An acclaimed interpreter of Shakespeare's works, his ideas have changed the way countless people approach the classics. I frequently found myself wishing he had either stuck to the unembroidered facts or had chosen to write a fictionalised account, where his speculation would have been clearly labelled as fantasy, not pseudo-fact. So the collaboration on Pericles was not the first connection between the two men. Starting from there, Nicholl follows every thread: where Shakespeare lived; the people he lived with; how they met and married; their professions; their associates; what he was reading. His landlord made elaborate wigs and costumes.

Next

Review: The Lodger by Charles Nicholl

the lodger nicholl charles

Nicholl is the kind of man that jumps to the conclusion that two people who happen to live on This book was quite readable, full of interesting detail and threw some light on one of the less explored periods of Shakespeare's life, but I found myself getting increasingly annoyed at Nicholl's flights of wild speculation and overstating his case. Nicholl is the kind of man that jumps to the conclusion that two people who happen to live on the same street at around the same time must know each other intimately, that two people who share the same common surname must be related or, indeed, in one extraordinary example featuring the second most common English surname, must be the same person. This is painting a portrait of Shakespeare by painting his surroundings. A masterpiece of academic research. Again I discover, as I did after reading Greenblatt's book, that I don't much like Mr Shakespeare.

Next

The Lodger Shakespeare

the lodger nicholl charles

I enjoyed having Shakespeare revealed to me as a real man in a real world. It works much better than Stephen Greenblatt's Will in the World, I think because Shakespeare is the hook, not the hub: despite the book's title, this is a life of Silver Street, rather than of Shakespeare. The English first came into existence as an idea, before they had a common ruler and before the country they lived in even had a name. Conjecture of the man is rampant; the facts are much rarer to find. He also can't resist going off at tangents, sometimes interestingly, but sometimes I get the impression he is just trying to show off his research, even when it's clearly not relevant, or just trying desperately to pad out a book which is quite thin he also frequently repeats material, which might be another padding tactic - either that, or he assumes his readers have the memory of a goldfish. The newlyweds then moved out and became tenants of George Wilkins, a brothel-keeper and occasional playwright, with whom Shakespeare was collaborating on Pericles. Author Biography Charles Nicholl is a historian, biographer and travel writer.

Next

THE LODGER SHAKESPEARE by Charles Nicholl

the lodger nicholl charles

Nicholls attempts to recreate life on Silver Street, where Shakespeare lodged for three years, by researching the Mountjoy family who were involved in a civil suit in which the playwright testified. He lives in Lucchesia in Italy with his wife and children. It is absurd to cherry-pick passages of poetry written over more than two decades and infer from them a consistent personal attitude. But close study of the documents surrounding the Mountjoy case and the drawing in of other documented facts allows for intelligent commentary on everything from Shakespeare's sexuality, the state of his marriage, and the identity of the Dark Lady to what his surroundings were when he wrote. He has created a tower, or a confection, of pure invention that, in the absence of countervailing documentary information - and there is none - turns out to be well within the boundaries of the script of Shakespeare's life.

Next

The Lodger Shakespeare by Charles Nicholl

the lodger nicholl charles

First of all, I'm going to try to remember not to approach histories through Audible. Vance gives verve to the excellent writing. Christopher Mountjoy, Shakespeare's landlord, is described as a tight-fisted irritable git - the court case relates to his alleged non-payment of his daughter's dowry and was referred by the English court to the elders of the French church, who found for the Belotts but awarded them much less than they sought. In all, the reader gets a well rounded view of London as it was in the early 17th century. It imaginatively recreates a fictional year in Shakespeare's life - not to tell us about Shakespeare, of whom nothing reliable can be said - but to show us how people lived in that age. Nicholl, who apparently has done this before in books - on, e. First of all, I'm going to try to remember not to approach histories through Audible.

Next

The Lodger Shakespeare: His Life on Silver Street by Charles Nicholl

the lodger nicholl charles

I appreciate what I have learned from this examination of the period. I enjoyed it, for the most part; it strayed into dry areas at times, particularly when it wandered away from the topic of Shakespeare himself. His presence allows Nicholl to examine the Jacobean underworld. Nicholl shows us how illuminating a creative historian can be. What with all those Henrys being succeeded by all those other Henrys in the histories, and all those worryingly ghostly patriarchs looming over the tragedies — Julius Caesar, Old Hamlet, Banquo — you never get very far from paternity in the Shakespeare canon.

Next

Book of the day: The Lodger by Charles Nicholl

the lodger nicholl charles

She is peevish, sullen, froward, Proud, disobedient, stubborn, lacking duty, Neither regarding that she is my child Nor fearing me as if I were her father. Is there such thing as a Western Taoist? This bio is based on more suppositions than any other bio I have read of Shakespeare. The first of these collaborators was George Wilkins, on Pericles, first perfomed in 1607. In the process we learn quite a lot of Shakespeare and something more of Elizabethan and Jacobean society. He was not the gentleman he so wanted to be. This atmospheric exploration of Shakespeare at 40 sees him not from the viewpoint of literary greatness, but in the humdrum and very human context of Silver Street. Nicholl does it by researching the people who lived adjacent to Shakespeare at that time, whereof we do have records.

Next

The Lodger Shakespeare: His Life on Silver Street by Charles Nicholl

the lodger nicholl charles

I feel I know more in some ways now about the Mountjoy family than I do about Shakespeare himself. As Charles Nicholl makes clear right at the beginning of The Lodger, when Shakespeare gave a deposition in the dispute between his one-time landlord and the landlord's one-time apprentice, he gave us a tantalizing glimpse, in his own voice, into his life in London in the early 1600s. It was a fascinating and revealing book. It gives interesting info about Shakespeare's collaborators that I hadn't seen before, and about the types of people Shakespeare associated with and would have been surrounded by, and how they and their occupations can be found in the plays of the time, by Shakespeare and his associates. I remember one art school assignment being to pick your favorite shoes and to draw them in fine detail; this was, basically, a self-portrait. It is one of six surviving signatures, and the earliest of them though it can hardly be called early: he was forty-eight years old and already in semi-retirement. A fascinating read for any Shakespeare buff, but maybe a little too dry and dtail-oriented for those with only a passing interest in the man.

Next